Geography

President Lincoln is assassinated and a nation mourns just as its jubilation had begun. The end of the Civil War is not the end of political, economic and social battles. Reconstruction continues the debates over relationships between federal and state authority, master and slave, industrial and agrarian societies.

 

The world knows about Malala’s passionate defense of the right of girls to an education, but she is not the only young adult who is making a difference. Read The Washington Post and other media to learn about young people around the globe who are addressing issues and finding solutions to problems. Brainstorm ways you can make a difference.

Although they have suffered severe losses, the Confederacy clings to independence. The goal of Generals Sheridan and Sherman is to break the Confederate will in their campaigns of destruction. Their success will influence the reelection of Abraham Lincoln.

All U.S. presidents have exercised executive privilege. George Washington refused to give documents to legislators, Dwight Eisenhower named it and Richard Nixon invoked it when asked to provide White House documents and secret tapes. We focus on the Watergate Story, 40 years after the resignation of the president, to examine executive privilege, the balance of power, the duty of federal employees and the responsibility of the press to inform, investigate and watch those in power.

The study of food is not limited to culinary arts, providing lessons in nutrition, making budgets and experiencing taste delights across cultures. Food is a key ingredient in migratory birds' survival balanced against man's desires, climate change and the commerical fishing industry. Snack food production is a business and billion-dollar economic force. Drought, climate change and consumption patterns influence the price of staples such as rice, corn and wheat as well as a cup of coffee.

Since President Woodrow Wilson signed legislation to create the Federal Reserve on December 23, 1913, its purpose has been to prevent a financial crisis and to preserve prosperity. Washington Post articles and commentary explain and explore the 100-year history of wise and dubious policies, the individuals who formed these policies and its day-to-day impact on economic conditions, employment and money in our banks and wallets.

Career opportunities for women in a traditionally male arena are considered through profiles. Student activities focus on areas over which the Federal Reserve has influence: the issuing of paper currency and establishing of interest rates. They are introduced to the American company that manufactures the paper on which all currency is printed. Activities also focus on interest rates and APR, making wise personal finance decisions, and designing commemorative paper currency.  

South Africa, rich in culture and the arts, presents a case study for independence, democracy and economic sanctions. Activities and articles help students to understand apartheid, its dismantling and the leadership of Nelson Mandela. 

Advances in technology permit exploration deeper into oceans and over wide expanses of uninhabited or unexplored lands. Centuries-old maps provide direction for modern-day trekkers seeking to follow in early pilgrims’ footsteps, modern maps allow comparison, and 3-D maps give dimension to discoveries above and below sea level.

Demanding equality for all, black Americans exercised First Amendment rights of speech, assembly and petition for a redress of grievances. The civil rights movement needed leaders, but grassroots efforts and demands of Americans brought about change.

Major stories and subthemes — Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson at the turning point of the war, women in combat and friendly fire, strategy and resolve — are found in the suggested lessons and Washington Post articles that focus on March-September 1863. Students focus on leadership, map reading and geography, close reading and annotation, as well as a variety of research topics and writing genres. 

Pages