Geography

All U.S. presidents have exercised executive privilege. George Washington refused to give documents to legislators, Dwight Eisenhower named it and Richard Nixon invoked it when asked to provide White House documents and secret tapes. We focus on the Watergate Story, 40 years after the resignation of the president, to examine executive privilege, the balance of power, the duty of federal employees and the responsibility of the press to inform, investigate and watch those in power.

The study of food is not limited to culinary arts, providing lessons in nutrition, making budgets and experiencing taste delights across cultures. Food is a key ingredient in migratory birds' survival balanced against man's desires, climate change and the commerical fishing industry. Snack food production is a business and billion-dollar economic force. Drought, climate change and consumption patterns influence the price of staples such as rice, corn and wheat as well as a cup of coffee.

Since President Woodrow Wilson signed legislation to create the Federal Reserve on December 23, 1913, its purpose has been to prevent a financial crisis and to preserve prosperity. Washington Post articles and commentary explain and explore the 100-year history of wise and dubious policies, the individuals who formed these policies and its day-to-day impact on economic conditions, employment and money in our banks and wallets.

Career opportunities for women in a traditionally male arena are considered through profiles. Student activities focus on areas over which the Federal Reserve has influence: the issuing of paper currency and establishing of interest rates. They are introduced to the American company that manufactures the paper on which all currency is printed. Activities also focus on interest rates and APR, making wise personal finance decisions, and designing commemorative paper currency.  

South Africa, rich in culture and the arts, presents a case study for independence, democracy and economic sanctions. Activities and articles help students to understand apartheid, its dismantling and the leadership of Nelson Mandela. 

Advances in technology permit exploration deeper into oceans and over wide expanses of uninhabited or unexplored lands. Centuries-old maps provide direction for modern-day trekkers seeking to follow in early pilgrims’ footsteps, modern maps allow comparison, and 3-D maps give dimension to discoveries above and below sea level.

Demanding equality for all, black Americans exercised First Amendment rights of speech, assembly and petition for a redress of grievances. The civil rights movement needed leaders, but grassroots efforts and demands of Americans brought about change.

Major stories and subthemes — Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson at the turning point of the war, women in combat and friendly fire, strategy and resolve — are found in the suggested lessons and Washington Post articles that focus on March-September 1863. Students focus on leadership, map reading and geography, close reading and annotation, as well as a variety of research topics and writing genres. 



0
0
0


Distinguish between winning and learning to play a sport, a safe environment and athletic pursuits, competition and integrity. KidsPost and Washington Post articles stimulate discussion of past and current professional athletes, their behavior and that of their coaches. Read, debate, write about people and animals who are engaged in sports as a business, a scholarship and career opportunity, and a measure of one’s respect for law, ethics and each other.

The United States Constitution requires the president submit his nominations for appointment for Senate confirmation.  Members of the Cabinet and independent agencies fulfill the executive role of enforcing the laws passed by Congress. Each supervises its areas of responsibility, collaborates on shared interests and handles complex issues. Real examples are illustrated through the U.S. relationship with Mexico and Canada. 

Citizens participate in the political process as they take polls, run for office and vote. Activities and lessons look at the candidates and policies, influence of campaigns, and the role of media (campaign ads, editorials cartoons, reporting). Through debate, research, mock elections and inaugural coverage, students engage in the responsibilities of citizenship.

Pages