History

The religion beat crosses over many areas — from art to conflicts at home and around the globe, to tourism and zoos. 

President Lincoln is assassinated and a nation mourns just as its jubilation had begun. The end of the Civil War is not the end of political, economic and social battles. Reconstruction continues the debates over relationships between federal and state authority, master and slave, industrial and agrarian societies.

 

Advances in technology permit exploration deeper into oceans and over wide expanses of uninhabited or unexplored lands. Centuries-old maps provide direction for modern-day trekkers seeking to follow in early pilgrims’ footsteps, modern maps allow comparison, and 3-D maps give dimension to discoveries above and below sea level.

Major stories and subthemes — Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson at the turning point of the war, women in combat and friendly fire, strategy and resolve — are found in the suggested lessons and Washington Post articles that focus on March-September 1863. Students focus on leadership, map reading and geography, close reading and annotation, as well as a variety of research topics and writing genres. 

The National Gallery of Art exhibit, Shock of the News, is the inspiration for this Washington Post NIE curriculum guide. The show exhibited works of artists who incorporated newspapers in their compositions — from Pablo Picasso’s use in 1912 of a fragment of a newspaper. The suggested art activities span the sections of The Washington Post and the variety of mediums found in the National Gallery of Art’s exhibit. The projects can be assigned in many disciplines and all grade levels. 

Providing future generations with places that reflect their cultural values and ideals and maintaining their political, social and historic legacy requires a commitment of individuals, organizations and government. After decisions have been made on whether to restore, adapt, preserve or toss, the next steps require collaboration, knowledge and persistence.

Through a study of explorers and early investigations, today’s students gain historic, scientific, cultural and technical perspective. They can make connections between past and present, understand modifications to prevailing theories and changes in mapping, and explain the impact of technology on expanding knowledge.

Students who know their rights will help ensure that those rights are not ignored. The right to protest is based in the First Amendment rights to assemble to voice objections and to petition government to provide relief to grievances.