Journalism,

In 2016, a significant Supreme Court case, executive action and congressional consideration of an omnibus bill all focus on aspects of juvenile justice. Explore the history of punishment, advances in rehabilitation and changes in confinement of youth.

Cuba provides opportunities to discuss and study government policy formation and international relations; preservation methods, partnerships and accords; journalistic integrity and historic legacy; ethnic, religious and cultural expression; and environmental diversity.

The religion beat crosses over many areas — from art to conflicts at home and around the globe, to tourism and zoos. 

The Washington Post Magazine informs, entertains and provides new perspectives and approaches to better living. Scholastic journalists can find models and inspiration to enhance their community coverage.

Media credibility is lost when media fails to seek the truth and falls short on the public's demand for accuracy, balance and clarity in their reporting. Media publishes corrections and encourages dialogue with its readers.

President Lincoln is assassinated and a nation mourns just as its jubilation had begun. The end of the Civil War is not the end of political, economic and social battles. Reconstruction continues the debates over relationships between federal and state authority, master and slave, industrial and agrarian societies.

 

The world knows about Malala’s passionate defense of the right of girls to an education, but she is not the only young adult who is making a difference. Read The Washington Post and other media to learn about young people around the globe who are addressing issues and finding solutions to problems. Brainstorm ways you can make a difference.

Using public transportation as the hub and Washington Post articles, opinion pieces, photography and informational graphics as the fuel, students engage in decision making and debate about gas taxes and infrastructure funding, engineering and design, economics and personal finance.

The editor directs content of a publication, influences the working environment, and develops staff members’ skills. In this guide we focus on lessons we can learn from the life of Ben Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post, and the job of scholastic editors.

All U.S. presidents have exercised executive privilege. George Washington refused to give documents to legislators, Dwight Eisenhower named it and Richard Nixon invoked it when asked to provide White House documents and secret tapes. We focus on the Watergate Story, 40 years after the resignation of the president, to examine executive privilege, the balance of power, the duty of federal employees and the responsibility of the press to inform, investigate and watch those in power.

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