Journalism,

All U.S. presidents have exercised executive privilege. George Washington refused to give documents to legislators, Dwight Eisenhower named it and Richard Nixon invoked it when asked to provide White House documents and secret tapes. We focus on the Watergate Story, 40 years after the resignation of the president, to examine executive privilege, the balance of power, the duty of federal employees and the responsibility of the press to inform, investigate and watch those in power.

As Grant sought to win the war, hundreds and thousands of lives would be sacrificed at places such as Cold Harbor, the Battle of the Crater and even in the D.C. area as Gen. Jubal Early approached the capital city. Using the work of Post staffers we examine how the Civil War’s casualties and those of today’s conflicts and wars can be understood in words and through informational graphics.

The study of food is not limited to culinary arts, providing lessons in nutrition, making budgets and experiencing taste delights across cultures. Food is a key ingredient in migratory birds' survival balanced against man's desires, climate change and the commerical fishing industry. Snack food production is a business and billion-dollar economic force. Drought, climate change and consumption patterns influence the price of staples such as rice, corn and wheat as well as a cup of coffee.

We focus on three areas in which governments deal with the legal and ethical obligations to provide education of good quality, without discrimination or exclusion: the rights of girls, children with physical disabilities, and undocumented students. We explore the issue through Washington Post articles, a guest commentary and an editorial; case studies, an e-Replica search and Think Like a Reporter activity.

South Africa, rich in culture and the arts, presents a case study for independence, democracy and economic sanctions. Activities and articles help students to understand apartheid, its dismantling and the leadership of Nelson Mandela. 

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010, focuses attention on the role of federal and state governments, insurance companies, businesses and individuals in providing for health care, from preventive care to benefits of insurance coverage and the use of technology to enroll citizens. Students locate the facts, analyze the issues, study different stances, and use a variety of media to express their points of view.

Advances in technology permit exploration deeper into oceans and over wide expanses of uninhabited or unexplored lands. Centuries-old maps provide direction for modern-day trekkers seeking to follow in early pilgrims’ footsteps, modern maps allow comparison, and 3-D maps give dimension to discoveries above and below sea level.

Demanding equality for all, black Americans exercised First Amendment rights of speech, assembly and petition for a redress of grievances. The civil rights movement needed leaders, but grassroots efforts and demands of Americans brought about change.

Major stories and subthemes — Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson at the turning point of the war, women in combat and friendly fire, strategy and resolve — are found in the suggested lessons and Washington Post articles that focus on March-September 1863. Students focus on leadership, map reading and geography, close reading and annotation, as well as a variety of research topics and writing genres. 



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Distinguish between winning and learning to play a sport, a safe environment and athletic pursuits, competition and integrity. KidsPost and Washington Post articles stimulate discussion of past and current professional athletes, their behavior and that of their coaches. Read, debate, write about people and animals who are engaged in sports as a business, a scholarship and career opportunity, and a measure of one’s respect for law, ethics and each other.

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