Language Arts,

Brain damage, a new competitive sport, advocacy advertisements, elder boom and young worker shortage, current global and national issues, our relationship with works and kids and an appreciation of Toni Morrison are covered in this month’s guide with suggested activities for using the Post reprints.

Current events and short, reflective pieces provide stimulus and models for student expression — and possible school community activities. Students can use these nonfiction works to analyze, interpret and practice rhetorical strategies.

 

Personal notes and business letters are important forms of communication, documentation and records for historians and sociologists. Beginning with “Dear Colleagues” letters, our You and Your Rights lesson focuses on transgender student access to school bathrooms.

The arts have shaped and been integral to cultures across the centuries. National, state and local government support and fund the arts, but not without scrutiny. Media has many approaches to inform citizens of fine and performing arts events.

Celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service includes looking back at its founding, enjoying the current protected areas — parks, monuments, historic trails and recreational areas, presidential museums, seashores, marine sanctuaries — and expanding conservation for future generations. 

Forming and asking questions is an essential skill of reporters. It has application in many life situations and career paths.

The Washington Post Magazine informs, entertains and provides new perspectives and approaches to better living. Scholastic journalists can find models and inspiration to enhance their community coverage.

Media credibility is lost when media fails to seek the truth and falls short on the public's demand for accuracy, balance and clarity in their reporting. Media publishes corrections and encourages dialogue with its readers.

The editor directs content of a publication, influences the working environment, and develops staff members’ skills. In this guide we focus on lessons we can learn from the life of Ben Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post, and the job of scholastic editors.

We focus on three areas in which governments deal with the legal and ethical obligations to provide education of good quality, without discrimination or exclusion: the rights of girls, children with physical disabilities, and undocumented students. We explore the issue through Washington Post articles, a guest commentary and an editorial; case studies, an e-Replica search and Think Like a Reporter activity.

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