Media Literacy,

Forming and asking questions is an essential skill of reporters. It has application in many life situations and career paths.

The religion beat crosses over many areas — from art to conflicts at home and around the globe, to tourism and zoos. 

The Washington Post Magazine informs, entertains and provides new perspectives and approaches to better living. Scholastic journalists can find models and inspiration to enhance their community coverage.

Media credibility is lost when media fails to seek the truth and falls short on the public's demand for accuracy, balance and clarity in their reporting. Media publishes corrections and encourages dialogue with its readers.

The editor directs content of a publication, influences the working environment, and develops staff members’ skills. In this guide we focus on lessons we can learn from the life of Ben Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post, and the job of scholastic editors.

All U.S. presidents have exercised executive privilege. George Washington refused to give documents to legislators, Dwight Eisenhower named it and Richard Nixon invoked it when asked to provide White House documents and secret tapes. We focus on the Watergate Story, 40 years after the resignation of the president, to examine executive privilege, the balance of power, the duty of federal employees and the responsibility of the press to inform, investigate and watch those in power.

The United States Constitution requires the president submit his nominations for appointment for Senate confirmation.  Members of the Cabinet and independent agencies fulfill the executive role of enforcing the laws passed by Congress. Each supervises its areas of responsibility, collaborates on shared interests and handles complex issues. Real examples are illustrated through the U.S. relationship with Mexico and Canada. 

Primary documents — including diaries, photographs and eyewitness accounts — provide insight into the history of slavery in the District of Columbia and Lincoln's decision to end slavery in D.C. The D.C. Emancipation Act was the first step towards equality and enfranchisement of the modern Civil Rights Movement.

 


Citizens participate in the political process as they take polls, run for office and vote. Activities and lessons look at the candidates and policies, influence of campaigns, and the role of media (campaign ads, editorials cartoons, reporting). Through debate, research, mock elections and inaugural coverage, students engage in the responsibilities of citizenship.

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