Reading,

Brain damage, a new competitive sport, advocacy advertisements, elder boom and young worker shortage, current global and national issues, our relationship with works and kids and an appreciation of Toni Morrison are covered in this month’s guide with suggested activities for using the Post reprints.

Columnists are informed opinion writers with a distinct voice and style. They have the same ethical and journalistic standards as reporters but add a particular perspective gained through experience, education and a passion for the topic. Columns are strong models for student composition development.

  Having accurate and lucid weather information is essential to the safety, economic viability and comfort of a community. Severe weather, in addition to the immeasurable loss of life, costs billions in loss of personal and business property. The Post's Capital Weather Gang provides weather information through multiple platforms.

Analyze and write ledes, explore how focus may change a feature story and consider the journalist's role in maintaining the freedoms of press and speech through the suggested activities and reprinted Post pieces in this month’s guide.

 

The arts have shaped and been integral to cultures across the centuries. National, state and local government support and fund the arts, but not without scrutiny. Media has many approaches to inform citizens of fine and performing arts events.

Celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service includes looking back at its founding, enjoying the current protected areas — parks, monuments, historic trails and recreational areas, presidential museums, seashores, marine sanctuaries — and expanding conservation for future generations. 

America through the African American lens encourages a visit to the new Smithsonian museum on the National Mall, interaction with artifacts there and in your community, and dialogue with our history and culture.

The Washington Post Magazine informs, entertains and provides new perspectives and approaches to better living. Scholastic journalists can find models and inspiration to enhance their community coverage.

President Lincoln is assassinated and a nation mourns just as its jubilation had begun. The end of the Civil War is not the end of political, economic and social battles. Reconstruction continues the debates over relationships between federal and state authority, master and slave, industrial and agrarian societies.

 

The world knows about Malala’s passionate defense of the right of girls to an education, but she is not the only young adult who is making a difference. Read The Washington Post and other media to learn about young people around the globe who are addressing issues and finding solutions to problems. Brainstorm ways you can make a difference.

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