Technology,

Using public transportation as the hub and Washington Post articles, opinion pieces, photography and informational graphics as the fuel, students engage in decision making and debate about gas taxes and infrastructure funding, engineering and design, economics and personal finance.

Robotics and the new science of biomimetics appear in the media and provide lessons in scientific observation, technology and engineering design, and solutions to problems.

We focus on three areas in which governments deal with the legal and ethical obligations to provide education of good quality, without discrimination or exclusion: the rights of girls, children with physical disabilities, and undocumented students. We explore the issue through Washington Post articles, a guest commentary and an editorial; case studies, an e-Replica search and Think Like a Reporter activity.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010, focuses attention on the role of federal and state governments, insurance companies, businesses and individuals in providing for health care, from preventive care to benefits of insurance coverage and the use of technology to enroll citizens. Students locate the facts, analyze the issues, study different stances, and use a variety of media to express their points of view.

Advances in technology permit exploration deeper into oceans and over wide expanses of uninhabited or unexplored lands. Centuries-old maps provide direction for modern-day trekkers seeking to follow in early pilgrims’ footsteps, modern maps allow comparison, and 3-D maps give dimension to discoveries above and below sea level.

Water is essential to living. When water is polluted naturally, accidentally or on purpose, it must be treated and restored for consumption and beneficial use. The Chesapeake Bay provides a model of individuals, organizations and government collaborating to clean up water for the common good.  

Through a study of explorers and early investigations, today’s students gain historic, scientific, cultural and technical perspective. They can make connections between past and present, understand modifications to prevailing theories and changes in mapping, and explain the impact of technology on expanding knowledge.

 The Civil War spurred inventions and innovations that moved America into the industrial age, transformed naval warfare, and called for new modes of leadership.

Students who know their rights will help ensure that those rights are not ignored. The right to protest is based in the First Amendment rights to assemble to voice objections and to petition government to provide relief to grievances.