Art

Celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service includes looking back at its founding, enjoying the current protected areas — parks, monuments, historic trails and recreational areas, presidential museums, seashores, marine sanctuaries — and expanding conservation for future generations. 

America through the African American lens encourages a visit to the new Smithsonian museum on the National Mall, interaction with artifacts there and in your community, and dialogue with our history and culture.

Although essential to our infrastructure, bridges are also symbols and inspiration for writers, artists and engineers. Neo-classic D.C. and modern sensibilities vie for funds, to maintain and change the face and functionality of D.C.

During the presidential election years, students have the opportunity to observe democracy in action — primary votes and caucuses, local speeches and televised debates, spin and social media. Press coverage of candidates through editorial boards, reporters, photographers and commentators serves the public's right to know in order to make their own decisions.

Cuba provides opportunities to discuss and study government policy formation and international relations; preservation methods, partnerships and accords; journalistic integrity and historic legacy; ethnic, religious and cultural expression; and environmental diversity.

The religion beat crosses over many areas — from art to conflicts at home and around the globe, to tourism and zoos. 

The Washington Post Magazine informs, entertains and provides new perspectives and approaches to better living. Scholastic journalists can find models and inspiration to enhance their community coverage.

President Lincoln is assassinated and a nation mourns just as its jubilation had begun. The end of the Civil War is not the end of political, economic and social battles. Reconstruction continues the debates over relationships between federal and state authority, master and slave, industrial and agrarian societies.

 

The world knows about Malala’s passionate defense of the right of girls to an education, but she is not the only young adult who is making a difference. Read The Washington Post and other media to learn about young people around the globe who are addressing issues and finding solutions to problems. Brainstorm ways you can make a difference.

Using public transportation as the hub and Washington Post articles, opinion pieces, photography and informational graphics as the fuel, students engage in decision making and debate about gas taxes and infrastructure funding, engineering and design, economics and personal finance.

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