Civics,

During the presidential election years, students have the opportunity to observe democracy in action — primary votes and caucuses, local speeches and televised debates, spin and social media. Press coverage of candidates through editorial boards, reporters, photographers and commentators serves the public's right to know in order to make their own decisions.

Forming and asking questions is an essential skill of reporters. It has application in many life situations and career paths.

In 2016, a significant Supreme Court case, executive action and congressional consideration of an omnibus bill all focus on aspects of juvenile justice. Explore the history of punishment, advances in rehabilitation and changes in confinement of youth.

Cuba provides opportunities to discuss and study government policy formation and international relations; preservation methods, partnerships and accords; journalistic integrity and historic legacy; ethnic, religious and cultural expression; and environmental diversity.

The religion beat crosses over many areas — from art to conflicts at home and around the globe, to tourism and zoos. 

The editor directs content of a publication, influences the working environment, and develops staff members’ skills. In this guide we focus on lessons we can learn from the life of Ben Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post, and the job of scholastic editors.

Although they have suffered severe losses, the Confederacy clings to independence. The goal of Generals Sheridan and Sherman is to break the Confederate will in their campaigns of destruction. Their success will influence the reelection of Abraham Lincoln.

All U.S. presidents have exercised executive privilege. George Washington refused to give documents to legislators, Dwight Eisenhower named it and Richard Nixon invoked it when asked to provide White House documents and secret tapes. We focus on the Watergate Story, 40 years after the resignation of the president, to examine executive privilege, the balance of power, the duty of federal employees and the responsibility of the press to inform, investigate and watch those in power.

Demanding equality for all, black Americans exercised First Amendment rights of speech, assembly and petition for a redress of grievances. The civil rights movement needed leaders, but grassroots efforts and demands of Americans brought about change.

Major stories and subthemes — Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson at the turning point of the war, women in combat and friendly fire, strategy and resolve — are found in the suggested lessons and Washington Post articles that focus on March-September 1863. Students focus on leadership, map reading and geography, close reading and annotation, as well as a variety of research topics and writing genres. 

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