Civics,

Citizens participate in the political process as they take polls, run for office and vote. Activities and lessons look at the candidates and policies, influence of campaigns, and the role of media (campaign ads, editorials cartoons, reporting). Through debate, research, mock elections and inaugural coverage, students engage in the responsibilities of citizenship.

Students study slavery in the United States through the prism of the Civil War, historic documents and legal acts: From D.C. slave auctions to the D.C. Emancipation Act of 1862, from the battles of Harpers Ferry and bloody Antietam to the Emancipation Proclamation, from selective manumission to the Fourteenth Amendment. Activities and articles focus on April 1862 to January 1, 1863.

 


Students who know their rights will help ensure that those rights are not ignored. The right to protest is based in the First Amendment rights to assemble to voice objections and to petition government to provide relief to grievances.

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