Debate,

During the presidential election years, students have the opportunity to observe democracy in action — primary votes and caucuses, local speeches and televised debates, spin and social media. Press coverage of candidates through editorial boards, reporters, photographers and commentators serves the public's right to know in order to make their own decisions.

Cuba provides opportunities to discuss and study government policy formation and international relations; preservation methods, partnerships and accords; journalistic integrity and historic legacy; ethnic, religious and cultural expression; and environmental diversity.

We focus on three areas in which governments deal with the legal and ethical obligations to provide education of good quality, without discrimination or exclusion: the rights of girls, children with physical disabilities, and undocumented students. We explore the issue through Washington Post articles, a guest commentary and an editorial; case studies, an e-Replica search and Think Like a Reporter activity.



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Distinguish between winning and learning to play a sport, a safe environment and athletic pursuits, competition and integrity. KidsPost and Washington Post articles stimulate discussion of past and current professional athletes, their behavior and that of their coaches. Read, debate, write about people and animals who are engaged in sports as a business, a scholarship and career opportunity, and a measure of one’s respect for law, ethics and each other.

Primary documents — including diaries, photographs and eyewitness accounts — provide insight into the history of slavery in the District of Columbia and Lincoln's decision to end slavery in D.C. The D.C. Emancipation Act was the first step towards equality and enfranchisement of the modern Civil Rights Movement.

 


Citizens participate in the political process as they take polls, run for office and vote. Activities and lessons look at the candidates and policies, influence of campaigns, and the role of media (campaign ads, editorials cartoons, reporting). Through debate, research, mock elections and inaugural coverage, students engage in the responsibilities of citizenship.

Students study slavery in the United States through the prism of the Civil War, historic documents and legal acts: From D.C. slave auctions to the D.C. Emancipation Act of 1862, from the battles of Harpers Ferry and bloody Antietam to the Emancipation Proclamation, from selective manumission to the Fourteenth Amendment. Activities and articles focus on April 1862 to January 1, 1863.

 


Providing future generations with places that reflect their cultural values and ideals and maintaining their political, social and historic legacy requires a commitment of individuals, organizations and government. After decisions have been made on whether to restore, adapt, preserve or toss, the next steps require collaboration, knowledge and persistence.

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