English,

Personal notes and business letters are important forms of communication, documentation and records for historians and sociologists. Beginning with “Dear Colleagues” letters, our You and Your Rights lesson focuses on transgender student access to school bathrooms.

The arts have shaped and been integral to cultures across the centuries. National, state and local government support and fund the arts, but not without scrutiny. Media has many approaches to inform citizens of fine and performing arts events.

America through the African American lens encourages a visit to the new Smithsonian museum on the National Mall, interaction with artifacts there and in your community, and dialogue with our history and culture.

Forming and asking questions is an essential skill of reporters. It has application in many life situations and career paths.

In 2016, a significant Supreme Court case, executive action and congressional consideration of an omnibus bill all focus on aspects of juvenile justice. Explore the history of punishment, advances in rehabilitation and changes in confinement of youth.

Cuba provides opportunities to discuss and study government policy formation and international relations; preservation methods, partnerships and accords; journalistic integrity and historic legacy; ethnic, religious and cultural expression; and environmental diversity.

The Washington Post Magazine informs, entertains and provides new perspectives and approaches to better living. Scholastic journalists can find models and inspiration to enhance their community coverage.

The world knows about Malala’s passionate defense of the right of girls to an education, but she is not the only young adult who is making a difference. Read The Washington Post and other media to learn about young people around the globe who are addressing issues and finding solutions to problems. Brainstorm ways you can make a difference.

The editor directs content of a publication, influences the working environment, and develops staff members’ skills. In this guide we focus on lessons we can learn from the life of Ben Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post, and the job of scholastic editors.

As Grant sought to win the war, hundreds and thousands of lives would be sacrificed at places such as Cold Harbor, the Battle of the Crater and even in the D.C. area as Gen. Jubal Early approached the capital city. Using the work of Post staffers we examine how the Civil War’s casualties and those of today’s conflicts and wars can be understood in words and through informational graphics.

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